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News

Filtering by Tag: Urban Research

'Spaces of Disappearance' mentioned in Salon

Hilary Huckins-Weidner

"This affecting and harrowing book examines the spatial manifestations of the War on Terror. From the uncertain sovereign spaces of Guantanamo Bay to the prefabricated metal cells that are used to house detainees in black sites, to the globally disbursed architecture of torture and disappearance, this book's focus on extraordinary rendition illuminates the uneven spatio-temporal distributions of power and violence." — Laleh Khalili, Author of  Time in the Shadows: Confinement in Counterinsurgencies

"This affecting and harrowing book examines the spatial manifestations of the War on Terror. From the uncertain sovereign spaces of Guantanamo Bay to the prefabricated metal cells that are used to house detainees in black sites, to the globally disbursed architecture of torture and disappearance, this book's focus on extraordinary rendition illuminates the uneven spatio-temporal distributions of power and violence." — Laleh Khalili, Author of Time in the Shadows: Confinement in Counterinsurgencies

Zoned Out in dDAB

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dDAB Commentary: …The diversity of subject matter, the quality of the scholarship, and the progressive ideals shared by the various subjects are highly commendable in the case of those three books. The same can be said of Zoned Out!, which features six chapters on the role of zoning in displacing low-income communities of color in New York City.

More at dDAB.

“In March, when my book  NYC Walks  was released, I was fortunate enough to be in conversation with Michael Sorkin at Rizzoli Bookstore. Following our talk and me signing a few copies of my book, I passed by titles from Sorkin's UR Books (an imprint of his nonprofit Terreform) conveniently located by the register. The product placement worked…”  More at dDAB .

“In March, when my book NYC Walks was released, I was fortunate enough to be in conversation with Michael Sorkin at Rizzoli Bookstore. Following our talk and me signing a few copies of my book, I passed by titles from Sorkin's UR Books (an imprint of his nonprofit Terreform) conveniently located by the register. The product placement worked…” More at dDAB.

In Conversation: NYC Walks (Prestel Publishing, 2019) - John Hill - Michael Sorkin

In Conversation: NYC Walks (Prestel Publishing, 2019) - John Hill - Michael Sorkin

Vanessa Keith - In Conversation with Peter B. Collins

mariacecilia fagel

UR author, Vanessa Keith, in conversation with independent news analyst and radio host, Peter B. Collins — includes a multimedia overview of 2100: A Dystopian Utopia.

More on architect and author Vanessa Keith:

I’m Italian, Jamaican, and Chinese, born in Jamaica and raised in the US. After I finished my Master of International Affairs at Columbia’s School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA), many of the jobs I was interested in required some level of technical expertise, so I decided to go to architecture school for an M.Arch at PennDesign at the University of Pennsylvania. I also chose architecture because I had studied urban planning as a focus area while at SIPA, so I was already very interested in how cities shape and reflect who we are. Saskia Sassen, who wrote the preface to my book, 2100: A Dystopian Utopia—The City After Climate Change, was one of my favorite professors while I was at Columbia and has definitely had a hand in shaping my thinking about all things urban…

Featured Member: Vanessa Keith, AIA; Interview by Alexander Luckmann

Correspond. Collaborate. Let Vanessa and her team know what you think: info@studioteka.com

Zoned Out! Gowanus Rally

Hilary Huckins-Weidner

Real-feature-e1558540416788-1024x768.jpg

Zoned Out! editor, Tom Angotti, and contributor, Philip DePaolo, rallied with Gowanus residents last Wednesday “calling for a moratorium on the city’s controversial plan that could bring 20,000 new residents to the area. Protesters argued that the cleanup of the toxic Gowanus Canal should take precedence over a rezoning.” More from Brooklyn Daily Eagle, article and photo by Scott Enman.

'Clean It Before You Rezone It,' Gowanus Activists Tell City by Anna Quinn in Patch - Gowanus.

In 2008, Angotti “The Race to Develop a Toxic Waterway” (Gotham Gazette).

The Gowanus Canal in south Brooklyn at the center of a formerly active industrial area once bustled with ocean-going ships. Today, it bustles with real estate investors who are pressing to convert industrial properties to condos and reinvent the canal as a miniature Venice.

At a recent public meeting with the city's water experts many Gowanus residents did not exactly break out the sparkling to celebrate. Some remembered that when the flushing tunnel, which first opened in 1911, failed in 1961, it took the city almost 40 years to repair it. Over the years, the city has taken major action on water pollution -- building sewage treatment plants, stopping ocean dumping and addressing sewage overflows - only when the courts have forced it to.

Photo by Jim in Times Square, 2008

Photo by Jim in Times Square, 2008

In 2013, Angotti: “New York City after Sandy: Who Benefits, Who Pays and Where’s the Long-Term Planning?” (Seventh Generation)

Bloomberg’s rezoning of Coney Island included new opportunities for condos and commercial development near the waterfront. He has been outspoken in his support for new condos in Gowanus and Newtown Creek, both located in the floodplains of Brooklyn and saturated with toxic waste. He ignored calls from community activists to clean up Gowanus before promoting new residential development, and the administration even opposed a federally funded Superfund cleanup. The mayor argues that the best hope for cleaning up the toxic land and water lies in private real estate development, which would improve each site as it develops. However, this would only shift the problem from one property to another and still expose new and older residents and workers to toxic waste.

In perhaps the most dramatic rezoning, the City overcame substantial opposition by neighborhood groups and in 2005 rezoned the waterfront in Brooklyn’s Williamsburg and Greenpoint neighborhoods. This unleashed a frenzy of luxury condo development on the waterfront, resulted in the displacement of thousands of industrial jobs and virtually wiped out one of the last remaining city neighborhoods to combine industry and housing.

See Philip De Paolo’s analysis of the effects of Bloomberg’s rezoning of Brooklyn’s Williamsburg and Greenpoint neighborhoods in Zoned Out: Race, Displacement, and City Planning in New York City.

“New York is a city of neighborhoods, but Angotti, Morse, and their coauthors show that city planning policies systematically disenfranchise and displace low-income New Yorkers who live in historic communities of color. They urge us to rethink what ‘affordable’ housing means, and develop the political will to aim for a radically different system of public resources and community plans.” — Sharon Zukin, Brooklyn College and CUNY Graduate Center

“New York is a city of neighborhoods, but Angotti, Morse, and their coauthors show that city planning policies systematically disenfranchise and displace low-income New Yorkers who live in historic communities of color. They urge us to rethink what ‘affordable’ housing means, and develop the political will to aim for a radically different system of public resources and community plans.” — Sharon Zukin, Brooklyn College and CUNY Graduate Center

Editor’s note: In one of the final written statements about urban planning, the legendary Jane Jacobs (1916-2006) commented on the future of the Williamsburg-Greenpoint waterfront:

April 15, 2005

Mayor Michael Bloomberg and all members of the City Council

c/o City Council President Gifford Miller

Dear Mayor Bloomberg,

My name is Jane Jacobs. I am a student of cities, interested in learning why some cities persist in prospering while others persistently decline; why some provide social environments that fulfill the dreams and hopes of ambitious and hardworking immigrants, but others cruelly disappoint the hopes of immigrant parents that they have found an improved life for their children. I am not a resident of New York although most of what I know about cities I learned in New York during the almost half-century of my life here after I arrived as an immigrant from an impoverished Pennsylvania coal mining town in 1934.

… More via Brooklyn Rail.

What Piques UR Interest?

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Check out and support forthcoming Terreform Urban Research books.

“While other publishers continue to pare down their offerings, UR has doubled down on the production of thought-provoking work.” — 2019 AIA Honors – Collaborative Achievement Michael Sorkin

UR authors at CUNY Climate Action Lab

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On May 3, Vanessa Keith (2100: A Dystopian Utopia - The City After Climate Change) and Tom Angotti (Zoned Out! Race, Displacement, and City Planning in New York City) will take part of an event at the CUNY Climate Action Lab.

The full-day event is a collaborative planning, workshopping, and discussion on climate justice. Climate Action Lab was founded by Ashley Dawson (Extreme Cities The Peril and Promise of Urban Life in the Age of Climate Change).

Program and RSVP.

Launch of Spaces of Disappearance at Center for Architecture

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To date, dozens of political histories, participant autobiographies, journalistic accounts, and academic investigations have addressed the many aspects of the War on Terror. Urban Research’s (UR) latest book, Spaces of Disappearance: The Architecture of Extraordinary Rendition by architectural researcher and educator Jordan H. Carver, adds to the national conversation and reckoning with torture by providing an in-depth analysis of the US’s secret network of black site prisons as a project of architectural production.

From the book’s introduction by architectural historian and theorist Felicity D. Scott: “Reflecting back on this recent history of violence through a critical architectural lens, Carver articulates a compelling conceptual and evidentiary terrain and an ethico-political framework through which to return not just to the war in Iraq but also to that in Afghanistan and the even more nebulous War on Terror.

On September 21, the Center for Architecture welcomed Carver for a conversation with Laura Pitter, Senior National Security Counsel at Human Rights Watch and Amrit Singh of the Open Society Justice Initiative. The conversation was moderated by Reinhold Martin, Professor of Architecture at Columbia GSAPP.